Can You Identify Normal Horse Vital Signs?






I saw this article from Standlee Feeds (no affiliation except I like their feed…) and thought it was good information.

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August 31, 2021

In the words of Dr. Cubitt, “Know what is normal for your horse, so you can identify when something is abnormal.” Knowing your horse, their quirks and tendencies not only helps to create an unbreakable bond and solid relationship but can also keep them healthy and well.

Normal horse temperature should be between 99.5 and 101.3 degrees Fahrenheit
The most accurate way to take a horse’s temperature is rectally (dipped in lubricant), using a digital thermometer.

Tips:

Always be sure to clean the thermometer after use
Exercise, stress or infections can elevate temperature
Leave the thermometer in long enough to avoid a false low reading

Normal horse pulse is between 38 and 40 beats per minute
There are 3 ideal areas to take your horse’s pulse: under the jaw, beneath the tail at its bone or an area on the side of the foot. Count for 15 seconds and multiple by 4.

Tips:

Don’t double count heartbeats
The normal pulse for foals is between 70-120 beats per minute
The normal pulse for yearlings is between 45-60 beats per minute

Normal horse respiration is between 8 and 15 breaths per minute
Watching your horse’s ribcage or nostrils for 1 minute, count 1 inhale and 1 exhale as a single breath.

Tips:

Do not measure respiration by letting your horse sniff your hand
Wait for 30 minutes after exercise to check rate
Respiration rate should not exceed pulse rate

Horse dehydration can be observed when the skin takes more than two seconds to return to its place
Pinch the skin on your horse’s neck or shoulder area and it should return to its usual position within 1-2 seconds.

Tips:

Horses need 5-12 gallons of water per day in normal environments
In heat or with heavy exercise, horses need 15-20 gallons of water per day
Learn more about horse hydration needs during the winter and summer months.

A normal horse gut sound is gurgling, like the sound of fluid dripping or tinkling
Place ear or a stethoscope up against the horse’s body, just behind the last rib, checking both sides.

Tips:

Call the vet if there is an absence of sound, as it could indicate colic
Normal horse capillary refill time is between one and two seconds
Place finger against horse’s gums for 2 seconds, creating a white mark from finger pressure. The white mark should return to a normal pink tone within 1-2 seconds.

Other Tips for Horse Owners:

Be sure to check vital signs regularly to know what is normal, so that you can identify anything abnormal
Do not take vital measurements on a nervous horse to ensure accuracy
Call your veterinarian immediately if anything is abnormal
If all else fails and you are unsure if something is wrong, be sure to contact your veterinarian. If you have questions on nutrition, please contact the nutritionists at Standlee Premium Western Forage.

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Click here for this quick fact sheet pdf, laminate and hang in your barn for easy access and share our image from Facebook or Instagram with your horse friends!

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September Bucket Fund: The next 5 horses to make up “Donna’s 10”!






Thank you all for responding to our September Bucket Fund:  “Donna’s 10!” in honor of my Mother who passes last month.

Initially, we had 5 horses at Falcon Ridge.  (Story here)

Now, we have the final 5 who arrived to Falcon Ridge (near San Diego) last week.  All are old, neglected and starved.

Thank you thank you thank you for helping us soothe their last year!  No one deserves to be cast aside, just because they are older!!

We are just $70 away from our goal!

All donations are 100% tax deductible!  Thank you in advance!



IF you receive this post via email, click here to donate!

This was 29 year-old Bitsy when she arrived at Falcon Ridge Rescue.

THE NEW 5 TO MAKE UP THE “DONNA 10!”

These horses are the next group to arrive at Falcon Ridge after their initial seizure from the same situation as the initial 5 horses in “Donna’s 10!”.

Bitsy is 29!!  Wotan, Rap Rock and River are all 20.  Puma is 21.   We have very little information to give out because the animal cruelty case is under investigation. They all need special food, vet care, feet and teeth work.

Luckily, these new 5 horses have had food and water for the past week while in the Sheriff’s care.  However, they all need special attention, which is why they were moved (with the original 5) to Falcon Ridge Rescue.

THANK YOU THANK YOU.  My mother would be very proud…

This is Bitsy. She is 29!!!

This frightened looking soul is Tap Rock.

This sweet face is River.

This lovely horse is Puma.

Wotan. He looks the best of the group from this photo. However, I don’t know his special conditions

All donations are 100% tax deductible!  Thank you in advance!



IF you receive this post via email, click here to donate!

 

THANK YOU ALL FOR THE PRAYERS, GOOD THOUGHTS AND DONATIONS!


Supporting The Bucket Fund through Amazon Smile
Please choose HORSE AND MAN, INC when you shop via Amazon Smile through this link.


Riding Warehouse
Your purchase with Riding Warehouse through this link helps the Bucket Fund!



HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!