AN EASY ‘ICE-BOOT IDEA’ FOR THE CORONET BAND OR HOOF: ANOTHER GREAT USE FOR THE EQUINE SLIPPER (No affiliation)…






I wrote about the Equine Slipper earlier this week – how it is a great, daily tool for me that I use while treating Tess’ feet.  (You can read that post here.)  I have no affiliation with Equine Slipper although I wish I did!  ;)

Anyway, after a reader read the post about the Equine Slipper, she sent in an EXCELLENT AND EASY IDEA for Icing a hoof/coronet band.  She uses an Equine Slipper!

Her horse was laminitic so she needed to bring down the heat in his hooves and calm the digital pulses.  The vet told her to ice both of her horse’s front feet.

She used Equine Slippers and store-bought Ice packs.

Brilliant!

(I wish I would have thought of this when I needed to ice both Tess’ and Norma Jean’s feet!  So much easier than what I was doing…)

This is the reader's mini who had laminitis.  Her vet told her to ice both the front feet to ease the heat and digital pulses.   She used Equine Slippers and little ice packs.  Brilliant!

This is the reader’s mini who had laminitis. The vet told her to ice both the front feet to ease the heat and digital pulses. She used Equine Slippers and little ice packs. Brilliant!  (She also taped ice packs to the rear feet of her boy, just in case…)

THE GREAT AND SIMPLE IDEA!

How simple and easy…!  Use an Equine Slipper and simply insert a small lunch or shipping ice pack!

I cannot believe the efficiency in this basic – but genius – idea.

I mean, most of us are resigned to using complicated or awkward icing boots.  And, for higher up on the leg injuries, that makes sense.  But, for a hoof injury or laminitic heat, how easy is it to simply take the ice pack from your kid’s lunchpail and slide it into your Equine Slipper?!

Wow.

These are the ice packs she used.  They were purchased at Walgreens.

These are the ice packs she used. They were purchased at Walgreens.

I had these in my freezer.  You can see how common these are... one came in a lunchbox and the other came inside of a Fed Ex package that needed to stay cold.  These are the perfect size.  Even better to freeze them around something hoof shaped like a large, empty tomato can.

I had these in my freezer. You can see how common these are… one came in a lunchbox and the other came inside of a Fed Ex package that needed to stay cold. These are the perfect size.  An even better idea would be to freeze them around something hoof shaped like a large, empty tomato can.

VARIATIONS ON THE IDEA

I think it would make sense to freeze your ice packs in a “C” shape so that they would form on the hoof fairly well.  For me, I think I’ll try freezing them on top of an empty large Stewed Tomato can…

And, I think when you insert the ice pack into the boot, you would want to cover the pack with a washcloth or some sort of cotton fabric so that the ice doesn’t stick to potential exposed skin on the coronet band.

To keep it from sliding around, I’d probably vet wrap it on the hoof or use Elastikon or some other waterproof tape.

Also, if you are planning on having an Equine Slipper around for this purpose, get the ‘one size up’ so everything fits.  You can easily insert a rolled washcloth or rolled cotton to take up the extra space.

You can see the simple velcro closure... Here she has the ice pack on the hoof and the Slipper is ready to be closed.

You can see the simple velcro closure… Here she has the ice pack on the hoof and the Slipper is ready to be closed.

THEY CAN WALK AROUND – YOU CAN LEAVE THEM WHILE THEY ARE ICED!

This is the best part of this great icing plan… you can set them up and walk away for an hour or two!  That generally isn’t the case with most ice boots.  You usually have to stall the horse or restrain them while they are being iced.  But with the Equine Slipper and Ice Pack duo, you can leave your horse in safety!

Another great reason to have Equine Slippers on hand!

This is the reader's mini horse wearing his Equine Slippers with the Walgreens ice packs inside - on top of the top of the hoof and coronet band.  He can still walk around and his owner doesn't have to tie him up or watch over him for the 1-2 hours that he wore these!

This is the reader’s mini horse wearing his Equine Slippers with the Walgreens ice packs inside – on top of the top of the hoof and coronet band. He can still walk around and his owner doesn’t have to tie him up or watch over him for the 1-2 hours that he wore these!

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2 comments have been posted...

  1. dawndi Post author

    Right! Yes, the post was not really about the type of icepack one uses (very good suggestions), it was about the Equine Slipper and all of its uses. And the Equine Slipper is a great boot to cover the peas/corn! They can walk all around in them, no worries.

  2. Ruthie

    Even easier: buy cheapo frozen peas and corn in the family sizes and use for horse hoof/pastern icing. Stays shapeable and reusable if covered with a wrap or boot

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