FIXING FENCES. (not to be confused with mending fences…)






Oy.

So, I did my due diligence.  I staked out a string line and spray painted the angles, ends and gates.  I marked all the gates with the direction of the opening.  I wrote all of it out on a Google Earth photo of the property… I walked it and went over it all with the fence foreman and I scoped out the daily progress.

After each work day was done, I would take note of the remaining posts and boards, to make sure we still had enough.  I did have to go out and get 20 more bags of Sakcrete… But, even though progress was slow, at least it was happening.

But, on the final day of work last weekend, when I did my after work check, I realized… they had fenced over 4 of the 6 gate openings.  Poof!  Gate openings were now fence.

What?!  I ran over to each opening to make sure what I was seeing.

Oy.

There are supposed to be gates on this aisleway so I can move horses into and between these paddocks - as well as open both gates and allow horses into the alley. I have indicated one of my stakes - which was not followed ... and I think this may have thrown off my gate marks except I can see one in this photo on the right... Orange paint on the dirt indicating the size of the gate and which way it opens. We discussed this, walked it and it was on the diagram I provided. The gates were sitting a few feet away. But, as you can see, the holes were fenced over ... And, when I checked, the openings were the wrong size anyway. Oy.

There are supposed to be gates on this aisleway so I can move horses into and between these paddocks – as well as open both gates and allow horses into the alley. I have indicated one of my stakes – which was not followed … and I think this may have thrown off my gate marks except I can see one in this photo on the left… Orange paint on the dirt indicating the size of the gate and which way it opens. We discussed this, walked it and it was on the diagram I provided. The gates were sitting a few feet away. But, as you can see, the holes were fenced over … And, when I checked, the openings were the wrong size anyway. Oy.

HOW TO FIX IT?

So, with my slackjaw catching flies, I circled disbelieving.  Were the gate spaces really fenced over – permanently?  Yes, they were.

And, not only that, I noted that the gate holes weren’t as big as the gates.  (I don’t know why I didn’t notice this earlier… I never measured the gate holes except for the big ones – the 12 footers… now I need to measure those again!)

Another Oy.

So, now I had 4 – 10′ gates with 8′ (fenced over) holes.

OK… well… we could just saw off all the boards (gulp – total waste of lovely, new fenceboards) and put up gates in those spots.  So, I returned all of the 10′ gates for 8′ gates.  Problem solved…

Except, when Hubby checked out the situation, he said that the posts are on 8′ centers instead of 8 feet apart.  So, that means that the space is only 7′.  So, all of my new gates won’t fit either.

They haven't finished this little section, so I guess I will put a gate in here. I need to measure the space and figure out which size gate will fit. Or work something out.

They haven’t finished this little section, so I guess I will put a gate in here. I need to measure the space and figure out which size gate will fit. Or work something out.

CONUNDRUM

So.  Hmmmm.  I guess I will call the Gate place again and ask if they have 7′ gates…  And make another trip… except I better measure the holes and see how large the gaps will be on both sides.  Ugh.  Or we sink half posts to make up the difference… or we notch out the existing posts.

Sigh.

I knew this two days ago, but didn’t say anything because I was pondering this dilemma.

Also, I’ve been packing the entire house.  I’m not done packing but I have to go back to Paso Robles tomorrow to deal with the fence so it can be done – so we can move the horses.  I don’t have the luxury of time to figure out an elegant fence fixing solution.

I guess you get what you pay for, eh?  I went with the less expensive guy (for good reason) and now I have this issue.

But, I’m still relatively healthy and in the scheme of things, life is really good.  So, please know that I’m not complaining.

I just wish he had not fenced over 4 of the gate holes.  Kinda tough to get horses into a paddock if there is no gate.  Just sayin’…

Hubby sent this to me tonight – the sunset at the new house. So, keeping the eye on the prize, soon all these issues will be resolved and the entire family will be living under one roof!

Screen Shot 2016-04-10 at 1.55.14 PM

MAY BUCKET FUND:  THE HUNG HORSES!  These lucky surviving horses are very much alive and would greatly benefit from our support during their long recover!  See a new pic of Cider below – he was the only horse found HANGING that survived!  He is coming around… and that face is one of jealousy because another mare is being groomed instead of him!  They say he is coming around and loooves to be groomed!  Click here to read their storyClick here to donate!

This is beautiful Cider...pouting because another horse is being groomed. Doesn't he look great?!



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3 comments have been posted...

  1. Sarahkate

    First order of business when improving rural property: LEAVE A GATE OPENING WIDE ENOUGH TO FIT A PICKUP TRUCK THROUGH. There are such things as standards for fence installation. Really. There are!

    Seems to me that IF this fence installer is a licensed contractor then you have a legitimate claim against them. You are entitled to a do-over from these idiots – at THEIR expense. If they aren’t licensed then perhaps you might in retrospect have considered hiring a licensed, bonded contractor with references for work on rural properties – because I think you’re going to be stuck.

    Eerily enough a friend just went through this, having failed to hire a licensed, bonded contractor whose references could be checked first. Not a pretty outcome.

  2. mary

    I’d have a little discussion with your fence guy because you DID go over the fence plan with him and you DID have things painted on the ground informing him of the fence plan. He has cost you money, hence, his cost should come down a bit because of his screw ups.

    Hope it all works out!

  3. Laurie

    Dawn…..what a view!!!!!!
    The rolling hills are breathtaking!!!
    I know you will work it ALL out.

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