Category Archives: Nutrition

SUNDAY IS AMAZING IDEA DAY! Beekeepers have figured out a way to put a TAP onto a hive – and just turn it when the honey is ready! No mess, no fuss – pure, fresh honey. Amazing.






I know just about nothing regarding bee keeping.

However, we all learned in school that in order to get the honey, you had to destroy the hive.

Seemed sad and messy… there had to be a better way.

Well, leave it to a Father/Son Aussie Team to crack the code of beekeeping!

These two figured out a way to make the panels of the hive disjoint when the honey was ready to harvest.  In this way, the honeycombs were broken and the honey would drain out – into a spigot – and then funnel into your jar.

The bees don’t lose their hives (and their comfort) and the beekeeper has a much easier job of harvesting honey.  No suit, no mess, no fuss.

Outstanding!

Now honey can pour directly out of the hive - instead of destroying the hive to harvest the honey.

Now honey can pour directly out of the hive – instead of destroying the hive to harvest the honey.

HOW DOES IT WORK?!

These two men have patented a honeycomb frame that goes into the beehive.  The bees fill the honeycombs with honey and seal off the tops, like they normally would.

But now, beekeepers with this system, can flip a crank to dislodge the honeycomb  alignment, that releases the pure honey which flows down a chute and into the spout for capture.

Amazing.

So, instead of breaking open hives, disturbing and upsetting the bees to then remove all the honeycomb, scrap off the bees, extract the honey, clean everything and then start over…  now it is just the flip of a crank.

They say with large operations, this can all be hydraulic so the beekeeper can flip one major switch and harvest all of his honey at once – easily.

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Here are the flats of honeycomb in this new system, inside of the hive.

 

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The pre-made combs look like this.

 

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The bees go to work filling up the combs and sealing them off.

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When the honey is ready, a switch adjusts the honeycomb so they release the honey.

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They honey flows downward and out of the flowspout.

Just set a jar under the spout.

Just set a jar under the spout.

Large beekeeping operations can flip a switch and have hydraulic power harvest all the honey at once!
Large beekeeping operations can flip a switch and have hydraulic power harvest all the honey at once!

WATCH THE VIDEO on how it works

You can watch the video on how it all works, here.

Watch the Video by clicking this image.

Watch the Video by clicking this image.

THEY RAISED THE MONEY THROUGH AN INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN!

This video was their Indiegogo campaign a few weeks ago (after 10 years of  trial and error to get their product just right).

The inventors wanted $70,000 to invest in manufacturing… but this was such a great idea, they raised over $8,000,000 in a very short time.

Amazing!

CLICK THIS LINK to buy your own system!  (No affiliation)

Click image to get your own system!  (No affiliation)

Click image to get your own system! (No affiliation)

 


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OUR MONTHLY MICHAEL JOHNSON INSPIRATIONAL MISSIVE (Yay!) and the January Bucket Fund Receipt!






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Michael Johnson has incredible timing… it always seems that whenever he sends his newest column, it is exactly what I needed to hear.

You, too?  Seems that way…

Without further ado, here is Michael’s newest article.  The January Bucket Fund receipts are below.

Michael Johnson and Shine.

Michael Johnson and Shine.

MICHAEL JOHNSON’S ‘ROPING PEN #184’

THROWING MY LOOP

Michael Johnson

WHERE DO YOU LIVE?

     Like most people in small towns do, I go to an early breakfast in the mornings.  At the local coffee shop, you can learn all the news there is to know.  You can ask the old cowboys anything about everything.  The only thing you can’t do is tell them anything.

     I’ve done that all my life.  I went to breakfast with my daddy when I was a boy, and I enjoyed the times we had.  As a small child, I sat by my father and listened as the men talked about horses, who roped well last weekend and why, and the price of cattle.  I listened to them talk about the droughts in their lives and the hardships they lived through.  I heard jokes I wasn’t supposed to hear and I heard stories about the depression, and on rare occasions, about the war – though they didn’t say much about the war.  When I asked my daddy why they didn’t tell more war stories, he said, “Too many memories, I guess.”  Even at that young age, I knew not to speak of that again.  Most of the time though, there was laughter back then.  My dad and I always seemed to be in a good mood when we left.  Lately, when I go to breakfast, that feeling is slipping away. I’ve noticed the topics and conversation tend to drift in different directions these days.  There’s less laughter now.

     Recently, someone said, “Those kids up at that college aren’t like we were.  Most of them are just no good.”  I didn’t know that.  I just heard the other day that our girl’s softball team had no player with less than a 3.8 GPA.  I was completely unaware those young women were no good. 

     Another day, a fellow said we were wasting time having a rodeo team at the university.  He said, “Those rodeo kids don’t care about graduating.  They just care about fighting and raising cane.”  You know, I didn’t know that either.  I had just met the rodeo team here at this university recently, and was charmed off my feet by their manners and courtesy – both young men and young women, and by the rodeo coach who told me his number one priority was graduation rates.  Most every rodeo coach I’ve ever met tells me the same thing.    

     And on and on the coffee shop crowd goes.  It’s much the same at the doughnut shop and the other breakfast place in this small town.  The government is terrible, the president is stupid, and the military is ruined.  I heard all those comments in one week.  Hmmmm…and I thought about my nephew. 

     He was valedictorian of his graduating class at Baylor University.  Now he’s an oral surgeon.  He could have a private practice in a high-rise in Dallas and make tons of money, or he could teach at Baylor Medical and live the life of a college professor, but that boy doesn’t do that.  Instead, he puts himself in harm’s way every day of his life.  He goes where the bad things are.  You will find him in Iraq where our soldiers give their lives, in Tahiti where people are shattered after the earthquake, and in Norman, Oklahoma, where lives were destroyed, and in Joplin, Missouri, where the wind blew away all the textbooks and destroyed the school.  He’s just a kid.  He’s in the Navy.  The Navy sends him to all those places where he spends 18 hour days sewing up children, indigent natives, and our warriors, in a little trailer called a “MASH Unit.”  He says they call it that because when people come to him, they are usually quite “mashed.”  And he laughs and he tells every one of them not to give up hope. 

     I wonder if that old man in that coffee shop – that old man, who thinks America is ruined – the same old man who never had a job that required him to work outside, and never spent a day in the military, yet the same one who calls himself a “patriot,” I wonder if he thinks that boy – my nephew – is ruined?  

     I live in a town where the teachers care and the police risk their lives for us every day.

Where I live, the wood ducks swim in the lake, three roping horses try their hearts out for me, with my dog who would give his life for me, as my friends would, and I would give mine for them.  In my town, there are hummingbirds, deviled eggs, and barbeque sauce, and I get to witness the wonder of my granddaughter catching a bream, and to see a sparrow take a bath in the sand.  All that and a good woman who loves me.  So I suppose I shouldn’t be angry with those old men.

After all, we don’t live in the same town anymore.

  “This is the day the Lord has made.  Let us rejoice and be glad in it.”

                                 — Psalm 118:24

 

     Michael Johnson

 

JANUARY BUCKET FUND RECEIPTS

And now for the boring but important business… here is the receipt for payment to Big Oaks Rescue who is taking care of the 25 horses who were living among carcases of their herdmates.

Our receipt for the January Bucket Fund donation to Big Oaks Rescue Farm.

Our receipt for the January Bucket Fund donation to Big Oaks Rescue Farm.

Here are short but happy responses from Big Oaks Rescue Farm:

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Big Oaks FB page. Click to visit.

Big Oaks FB page. Click to visit.

newrule2

JEWELRY THAT BENEFITS THE BUCKET FUND HORSES!  Every donation counts!  Click image to see the new pieces!

JEWELRY THAT BENEFITS THE BUCKET FUND HORSES! Every sale counts! Click image to see the new pieces!

Click here for webpage, click here for Facebook!

ALL PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE BUCKET FUND!

FEATURED:  Gawjus TURQUOISE  ST. FRANCY!         ONLY $68!
THE REAL DEAL! Turquoise nuggets , sterling bead, silver beads, silver rings and a Sterling St. Francy “Watch Over Me” pendant on a petite charm ring! Lots going on and it makes a ‘jangle’ sound when rustled. Front lobster clasp closure or REVERSE IT and wear it any way you want! 17″
To Purchase, click here: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=4L8VPKCYXLAFA

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This is Roxanne.  She is heavy in foal, too.  We need to save her and her foal (and her family!) Click to read their story and donate!

This is Roxanne. She is heavy in foal, too. We need to save her and her foal (and her family!) Click to read their story and donate!


Riding Warehouse
Your purchase with Riding Warehouse through this link helps the Bucket Fund!


Supporting The Bucket Fund through Amazon Smile
Please choose HORSE AND MAN, INC when you shop via Amazon Smile through this link.



HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!