Category Archives: Medical

Friday Slick update






It is Friday!!

Thank you all for asking about Slick.

He is a bit better.

Hubby succeeded in his duty of filling a bowl with soaked and very wet beet pulp pellets and a scoop of psyllium 3 times a day for Slick while I was away.

When I would call to inquire about Slick, Hubby would say, “He ate it all!  He was very hungry!”

Me:  Did you notice if he still had runny stools.

Hubby:  Uhhh.  No.

Me:  Did you notice if his breath still was rank and infectious smelling?

Hubby:  Definitely didn’t get that close…

Me:  Did he seem like himself?  Was he uncomfortable at all?

Hubby:  What do you mean?

Me:  Did he look like his stomach hurt?

Hubby:  No.  He seemed exactly like himself.

Me:  Has he gained any weight?

Hubby:  In two days?

Me:  I mean, has he filled out any on his topline.

Hubby:  His whatline?

Me:  Is he still alive.

Hubby.  Yes.

 

And so it goes.

I cannot really tell you how he is other than he is still alive and eating well.

However, tonight when I arrived home, I ran out to his paddock to check on him.  With my trusty headlamp, I could see that he was indeed, still alive.

Also, he was head-butting me for food so he seemed to be his normal self.

And, when I lifted up his tail (which he hates), I didn’t see any signs of new runny manure.

So, I think he is better… but I’m guarded because I don’t think nighttime reviews are very good.

VET DIAGNOSIS

For all of you that don’t know Slick’s plight, the vet thinks he has sand in his gut – for the first time ever – and his advice was very sloppy wet and soaked beet pulp with psyllium.

Sand in gut was the first issue…

We know Slick is Cushings and older Cushings horses often develop abscesses and infections.  The vet thinks the awful smell in his mouth is a sinus infection from a tooth.  Whatever the bad smell is, it is unrelated to the sand in gut problem, but it happened suddenly at the same time.

He thinks Slick is losing weight because of the sand mostly and maybe due to the tooth – although Slick is eating vigorously.

Once the diarrhea has stopped and Slick gains some footing, we will look into his mouth and figure out what is going on visually or with Xrays.  From there we will decide what to do.

The next immediate step is to get a handle on his Cushings.  When he was younger, his Cushings didn’t seem to be an issue… but now, clearly, it is.

TOMORROW

Tomorrow, he and Norma will be started on Prascend.  It is what they use now instead of Pergolide for Cushings.  The vet felt that since Slick is Cushings, his entire immune system is compromised.  When the immune system is compromised, infections and abscesses happen more often.

Since Norma had a horrible abscess last year, the bell inside my head rang.

Hmmmmm.

They are both Cushings.  They are both older (19/20) and they have both been very sick recently (Norma last year and Slick now).

I decided to try the Prascend since clearly Cushings has been knocking at the door.

I am also aware of many natural supplements for Cushings and I will get some Heiro for Slick as I liked what it did for Norma.  I also have supplements from Omega Alpha that are used for regulating sugars for Cushings so I’ll start him on Adren-X.  I love all of the Omega Alpha products so I have high hopes for Adren-X.  (I originally had it for Norma.)

Once Slick is looking stable, I will have the vet and his Xray machine out to check his head for whatever is causing the bad smell.  I’d sure like it to be simple that would clear up with antibiotics.  The vet has already told me all about extracting teeth, etc.

Ugh.

SLICK

For now, Slick is acting like himself.  He was banging on his gate when I just went to visit him.  He snaked his neck when he saw that I didn’t have any treats and then he head-butted me.

He is such a little criminal, thank Gawd he isn’t bigger…  ;)

I want to make him healthy so I have many more years of his pony-abuse!

 

 

This was Slick in the Spring – shedding.  Slick is a totally adorable criminal pony. He’s the kind of pony that would dump a kid in a heartbeat.  He’d destroy the barn looking for scraps to eat.  He is devilish but I love him!

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SLICK IS SICK. What my Vet said to do while I waited…






For the last week, I’ve been writing about Giardia, Salmonella and Equine MSRA… it was as if I was having a premonition or something…

Because last night – on a Friday night, of course – Slick started runny, wetter than wet diarrhea while I was feeding.

Me:  “What in the heck was that?!”

Slick:  “Sorry. I can’t help it.”

Me:  “Are you OK?!”

Slick:  “I don’t know.  I feel OK…”

Me:  “Why did you wait until Friday night to tell me?”

Slick:  “The vet told me that if I got sick on the weekend, he’d palm me an apple!”

Me:  Sigh.

Well, it wasn’t really like that as I’m sure my vet would never make a deal with Slick, but it does seem to me that my horses get sick on Friday nights…

Anyway, even though Slick looked OK and seemed OK, I was very worried since I had just learned all about Giardia, MSRA and Salmonella in equines!

Would he colic?

Would this spread?

I looked at his back end and saw the manure all over his back legs.  This must have started sometime earlier today.  Sigh.

So, of course, I called the vet.

Slick. My 19 year-old Shetland pony. I’ve had him since he was 2.

I CALLED THE VET

I’m such a worrier when my horses get sick because they rarely get sick… and when they have become ill, it has been bad.  So, I tend to become very fretful.  I have to keep my emotions in check.

“Did you tell my horses that if they got sick over the weekend you’d give them an apple?”

Vet (long pause):  What?

“Aw nevermind… it just seems that my horses always get sick at night or on the weekends.”

Vet:  “That’s what everybody says… What’s up?”

“Well, I’ve been reading up on Giardia, MRSA and Salmonella and…”

WHAT COULD THIS BE?…

I explained to my vet that Slick appeared absolutely fine except for the diarrhea.  He had no temperature, he was eating and drinking, he didn’t seem colicky, he appeared normal acting – the only difference is that lately he seemed to have lost weight – but I attributed that into my changing hay…

The vet said that he would happily come out.  However, if Slick had a bad bug like Giardia, MRSA or Salmonella, he would be very ‘off’.

“He wouldn’t be eating… he would look ill, act ill and you would know.”

With no temp, normal eating/drinking and normal behavior – but loss of weight – the vet thought it was sand or dirt in his gut.

Now, Slick has been in the same pasture for a very long time and never had sand or dirt in his gut…  But, I was willing to suspend disbelief and treat him for that until Monday rolled around.

You see, the vet said that there were no labs to run the blood or stool samples so if he came out, he would only guess at this point.   The vet figured he may as well tell me over the phone what to do – and then come by on Monday… as long as Slick’s symptoms did not worsen.

OK.  What do I do?

VET’S INPUT ON WHAT TO DO UNTIL MONDAY ROLLED AROUND…

As long as his symptoms didn’t get worse, the best things to do were:

1)  Serve him really, really wet and gloppy beet pulp (soaked pellets).  My vet felt that wet beet pulp clears the gut equally as well as any product designed for this.

2)  Fill a syringe with yogurt and 2 oz of Pepto Bismal.  (Slick weighs 250lbs)  This will ease his stomach lining and put some good bugs back in quickly.  (I also have other supplements for that….)

Poor Guy.  He will hate me when I do this to him.

3)  Do the ‘sand-poop thing’.  Take a baggie, invert it, pick up some poop, revert it, fill the bag with some water and hang it diagonally so the sand falls to the bottom of the bag.  In this way, you can see the sand and know the culprit.

Or, if the manure is too runny, put on a glove and feel the sand in the manure as you rub it between your fingers.

4)  What my old tyme vet said to do was feed the pony tapioca pudding for a week straight – morning and night.  The tapioca pearls will adhere to the sand and drag it out.

NOW I WAIT…

I’m watching Slick as if he was an egg.

I’ll keep you posted.

Monday can not come around quick enough…

 
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Copyright

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.


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HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!