Category Archives: Medical

10 handy facts about lameness






A reader sent this article (from the UK) to me and I loved it!  Great info.  Thank you!  And, thank Nantwich Equine Vets for posting. 

click to go to website

Nantwich Equine Vets

10 handy facts about lameness

1. A forelimb lameness is identified by looking for the head nod. The head will go up when the lame limb hits the ground and down when the sound limb hits the ground. It is easier to notice the ‘head nod’, therefore when the head nods, it is the opposite leg that is lame.

2. Check for heat and a pulse. Inflammation brings blood to the area.

3. A horse with arthritic wear and tear (common in older horses), will often get better as he goes, which is known as ‘warming out of it’. The lameness will usually be less obvious after a few minutes. Additionally he will often be worse on hard ground (tarmac) in comparison to the ménage. This is due to more concussion on his joints.

4. A horse with soft tissue damage will often get worse as he goes and is often lamer on a soft surface (ménage), as the tissue such as an affected tendon or ligament is being stretched more than it would be on a hard surface with no give.

5. A horse with bilateral forelimb lameness will be harder to detect as the head nod will now be apparent when both limbs hit the ground. However he will show a shorter cranial phase (his forelimbs will not come out very far from underneath him resulting in a ‘choppy’ gait).

6. If you are struggling to detect lameness get the Slo-Pro app for your mobile phone and record your horse. This will slow everything down until you train your eye into detecting lameness.

7. A hind limb lameness is more difficult to detect. If you watch the horse trotting away from you, the lame leg usually has more movement at the hip. It helps to attach white sticky tape to both hip bones to make this more obvious to the eye.

8. Putting a horse on a circle (lungeing), often shows up a forelimb and hindlimb lameness more easily.

9. If the horse looks lame on one limb, but has a stronger pulse in the opposite limb, it is usually because the sound limb has taken more weight to allow pressure relief of the affected limb.

10. A horse can look completely sound without a rider, and then almost three legged once someone is on board. Therefore if your getting a feeling that something just isn’t quite right, do not just jog him up on the straight or on the lunge and assume all is well.

** Shoeing/trimming intervals should be kept as short as possible. Studies have shown that as the toe grows, the foot ‘shoots’ forward (long toes, low heel), putting excess strain on the flexor tendons. If your horse always looks slightly ‘off’ just prior to shoeing, then this is a very probable cause and it may be worth shortening your shoeing cycle.

As a horse owner, developing an eye for lameness is one of the greatest skills you can learn. This will not only allow you to have your horse treated more quickly, but will hopefully nip smaller issues in the bud before they escalate into far bigger ones.

E. J Westwood.

NEW BUTTON. DIFFERENT FUND. LET’S DO THIS!

FUND TOTAL AS OF TODAY:  $622

I’m no genius. Just an average girl who has a passion to save horses in need. This is my idea going forward. If we have a constant fund going daily… we will have funds to give to those on the ground who are saving these horses in real time at the killing auctions.

Horse and Man Foundation, Inc has a new Fund button. KEEP THEM OFF THE TRUCK FUND. This fund will go on all day, all the time. It will always be here. If you want to save a horse from slaughter, you know we will do that here.

All donations are 100% tax deductible!



KEEP THEM OFF OF THE TRUCK donation fund!




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In honor of Black Friday, let’s look into the equine color “black”.






Originally posted in 2015.

THE COLOR BLACK IN HORSES.

Last night I was in the car with Hubby and I expressed my desire to talk about something ‘black’ in honor of Black Friday.

I said that I always love to chatter about genetics and how that effects coat color…  but that I felt most people already knew all of that stuff.  For example, that black and red are the same master gene – and Hubby stopped me.

He said, “What do you mean?”

Me:  “Well, that’s why Irish people have mostly red or black hair.”

Hubby:  “Huh?”

Me:  “Genetically, Black is the parent gene to red.  You have to have black to get red.”

Hubby:  “Really?  Like the Kurds?  I noticed when I was over there that they all have either black or red hair.”

Me:  “Exactly.”

Hubby:  “Well, I think that is interesting.  Why don’t you write about that.”

So I did.  (Well, actually, I just researched and cut and pasted… and wrote a little…)

See below…

Is this true black?

THE BLACK COLOR GENE IN HORSES

Do you remember doing a genetics eye color chart in High School biology class?  I do.  I loved it!

That chart stayed with me in my mind while I was a Morgan breeder…  I knew there were so many variables to coat color – like eye color in humans – and I also knew that Chestnut was the least favored Morgan color (at that time).  I wanted to steer clear of Chestnut if I could.

The first stallion I bred to my mare (Tess – bay) was a black.  Gorgeous black.  But, I knew that I didn’t have any idea if he was EE or Ee.   So, at that time, it was a roll of the dice to figure out what color the foal might become.  Black does produce red (Chestnut in the Morgan world).  I was tempting fate by choosing a black stallion.

Tess was bay  and I could follow her color lineage more closely via her papers.  She had lots of Chestnut in her pedigree… but Chestnut is recessive to black.   The stallion that I had chosen had a black sire and chestnut dam.  His papers showed many browns, chestnuts and bays.  In fact, there were no other blacks in his pedigree until you went back several generations.

Yet, he was black…  This fascinated me.

So, this foal, Gwen, who was the product of a black sire and a bay dam with lots if iterations in the woodpile, would be a surprise.

Gwen, turned up seal brown – just like many of her relatives on her sire side.

Actually, when she was born, she looked to be a bay until her baby coat shed.  Silly me, I was so anxious to get her registered that I did it before her true coat came through.  So, Gwen is registered bay when she has never had a bay day in her entire adult life.  Oh well…

Anyway, now one can almost predict the potential color of the foal if you have the sire tested with available robust color mapping tests.  Studs should already have this available – if they are in a color popular breed.

But for me, the variables are what I find so interesting.  If any part of the genetic color code is recessive, all sorts of variations can happen.

Love it!

Except, that is,  for true black.   True black, EE, can never be diluted.

Gwen’s sire’s pedigree with colors

 

My Tess (Gwen’s dam) pedigree with color.

 

ABOUT BLACK

I have cut and pasted the below article from three different sites – because they said it so well, I didn’t think I could rewrite it any better.  So, here you go!

(I found this from Abmor Acres Farm, 377 Chesbro Road   Pennellville, NY 13132, abmoracres@yahoo.com   /   (315) 668-9360)

What is TRUE BLACK

 

Easy to understand…

 

OK, A LITTLE MORE IN-DEPTH

(This is from UC Davis)

Defining the coat color

 

even deeper…

 

HOW BLACK CAN EXPRESS ITSELF

PHOTOS always help…

 

More…

 

EXPLAINED AGAIN VIA THE AQHA WEBSITE…

 

Since a QH can be any color… their color information is very interesting.

 

I LOVE COLOR MAPPING!!

Thanks for exploring this with me on Black Friday…

I write write more about horse colors in a later post.  Coat color expression really interests me!

 

Later I’ll go into other coat colors like this one… WOW!

 

HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth… if you like this, please pass it around!

 

NEW BUTTON. DIFFERENT FUND. LET’S DO THIS!

FUND TOTAL AS OF TODAY:  $465

I’m no genius. Just an average girl who has a passion to save horses in need. This is my idea going forward. If we have a constant fund going daily… we will have funds to give to those on the ground who are saving these horses in real time at the killing auctions.

Horse and Man Foundation, Inc has a new Fund button. KEEP THEM OFF THE TRUCK FUND. This fund will go on all day, all the time. It will always be here. If you want to save a horse from slaughter, you know we will do that here.

All donations are 100% tax deductible!


KEEP THEM OFF OF THE TRUCK donation fund!

 




HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!