Category Archives: Medical

BG had a Craniosacral and Neuromuscular Adjustment – Acupressure and Reiki today!


Tuesday, November 13th, 2018 | Filed under Medical




(Bowing my head towards all of those involved with the fires here in CA.)

After last week’s post where I spoke of BG’s refusal to carry a rider… I knew that her bones weren’t broken from her fall this Spring – but something was very off.

As with horses and compensation carriage (we do it, too… sore on the right hip so we swing the left leg around), for me, it is often very difficult to see exactly what is wrong.  Is it a muscle?  Is it a tendon?  So tough to know.

In Grass Valley, I would have known who to call.   But here in Paso Robles, I didn’t know who to call.  I was told of an excellent equine chiropractor, but I was feeling leery to start there because I know how it has felt on my body, and I didn’t love it.

Luckily, one of you readers put me in touch with a CMT here in my town!  The reader said, “There is an AMAZING equine body worker up near you in North County. Her eyes see what may be invisible to us and our vets and her techniques amazing . My horse has thrived under her care. (I live in south SLO County, in Arroyo Grande) It might be worth it to give her a call.”

A miracle! Thank you!  A great recommendation is golden.

She came today.

BG…

BG is a very reserved mare.  She thinks things through before reacting – mostly.  And she is the least emotional horse I have here.  Or, so it seems.

When BG met Jeannette, she was polite, but reserved.

I walked away to get something, and when I came back, BG had her eyes closed, her head down and was almost purring when Jeannette put her hands on BG’s neck.

A good start.

NO PHOTOS because I was too busy watching and learning

First Jeannette did something in BG’s mouth – where BG pushed against Jeannette’s palm and readjusted a bone in her head.  Immediately BG licked and chewed, and then wanted to do it again.

Next she went to BG’s poll…, nasal area, eyes, neck, spine, hips, sacro area, tail, stifles, legs, hooves, chest and finally the sternum, which Jeanette felt was the root cause.  BG had fallen on her sternum and everything was pushed up.  Her ribs were out of whack, as well as her Cspine and her hips.  The whole thing, basically, was out of whack.

Continually, throughout the time together, BG watched, licked and chewed, rolled her eyes back in her head, contemplated, pressed against the pressure – or pulled back for the stretch, allowed us to put our hands all over her – and she was totally willing.

I could tell that BG was learning, releasing and letting go of the way she was holding her body after her injury in the Spring… and even deeper.

After Jeanette was done with BG, she showed me a few moves that I could do as ‘homework’ to help BG continue to realign herself.

I’ve actually never seen BG so willing to have anyone touch her, physically and emotionally.

Hmmmmm.

Jeanette mentioned that BG is ‘holding something’ tightly inside of herself – something emotional.  And, to be honest, I believe it.  I think BG arrived to me when she was 10 months old – exactly as she is today… she has always been distant emotionally.  I always thought that was just the way she was.  It never occurred to me that she might need some special therapy…

Jeannette got there at 11 and left at 1:30.  BG stood there the whole time.  She only got impatient when I was learning on her… and that was after 2 hours!

I could tell that BG was learning, releasing and letting go of the way she was holding her body after her injury in the Spring… and even deeper.

To be honest, this treatment was above my head, but I loved watching the two of them work together.  BG definitely was on board in the process.

So, I now have 2 weeks to work with BG on my own… and then she will have another professional treatment.  It looked so easy when Jeanette did it… !!  Let’s see how BG and I do together!   I am to do this 3 days a week, and never in a row.

HERE WE GO!  Another adventure in horse healing!


Riding Warehouse
Your purchase with Riding Warehouse through this link helps the Bucket Fund!


Supporting The Bucket Fund through Amazon Smile
Please choose HORSE AND MAN, INC when you shop via Amazon Smile through this link.



HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!



Everyone is talking about REWILDING and TROPHIC CASCADE… and using large grazers to revitalize grasslands… – WHY NOT USE AMERICA’S WILD HORSES?! (Zebras are on the chart…_






For years now I’ve been harping on how we are killing our grasslands.  There are so many people talking about it in terms of ‘rewilding’ – to bring back our prairies.  Often bison are mentioned as the hooved animal who used to revitalize the prairies by roaming in herds, churning up the earth, nourishing the ground and then moving on – spreading seeds as they went… the way nature intended.

And today, again, in this article, the rewilding people mention water buffalo and rhino.  Well, we don’t have those in America, but we do have a whole lot of wild horses that move in herds, churn up the earth, nourish the ground and move on… who are cooped up in BLM ranges or holding pens.

Why not let the horses rewild the ranges, the prairies and forests – like they are doing in the UK and Europe?   Rewilding with horses is already a great success.  I wrote about it a while back here.

Why not nourish the soil and regrow the grass so it CAN maintain itself… with our herds?  And heal the grasslands that are now deserts.  Alan Savory’s Ted Talk is amazing on desertification of our grasslands.

*Note where zebras are on the charts…

Click to go to story

click image to go to storyRewilding’ the countryside with large grazers such as buffalo and rhino could stop global warming, new research suggests.

Rewilding is a type of conservation that involves restoring ecosystems by reinstating natural processes and missing species.

Large grazing animals could help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by increasing the amount of carbon stored in green spaces, experts say.

Scientists believe that replacing intensively-farmed livestock with free-roaming grazers could also reduce the amount of methane belched into the atmosphere.

Additionally, introducing rhinos could suppress wildfires as they eat fallen leaves and vegetation that is most likely to spark up a blaze.

'Rewilding' the countryside with large grazers such as buffalo (stock image) and rhino could stop global warming, new research suggests

‘Rewilding’ the countryside with large grazers such as buffalo (stock image) and rhino could stop global warming, new research suggests

According to 16 research papers published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, ‘trophic rewilding’ could stop global warming.

Trophic rewilding is about reintroducing animals in places where they have would have lived before humans drove them away, according to an in-depth feature by Carbon Brief.

Intensive livestock farming has contributed to a dramatic decline in native large, grazing herbivores.

These herbivore have been replaced by grazers such as cows which belch out higher levels of methane, which is significantly more polluting than carbon dioxide.

There is still little research into the methane footprints of large herbivores.

However, rough comparisons in a paper by Professor Joris Cromsigt from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences suggests that white rhinoceros, hippopotamus and elephants are among the least polluting grazers.

This is because they generally ferment their food in the large intestine.

Meanwhile, animals such as cattle, buffalo and bison produce larger amounts of methane.

All grazing animals could reduce global warming in another way by increasing how much carbon green spaces can hold.

This is in part because they traditionally help disperse the seeds of the largest trees which store the most carbon.

Research suggests that the loss of herbivores such as Asian and African forest elephants has caused tropical rain forests to lose up to 12 per cent of their stored carbon.

Dr Cromsigt suggests that one way to encourage people to protect wildlife would be by making it ‘pay for itself’.

He believes that if people stopped eating farmed beef and instead ate meat from wild-grazing animals, wildlife could be better protected.

He suggests rewilding could be funding by money from the Paris Agreement which is currently being invested in tree-planting.

‘Why are these programmes not investing in fighting the bushmeat crisis and restocking our empty forests with megafauna frugivores [fruit eaters]…or stopping the current onslaught on African and Asia megafauna, such as elephants and rhinoceros?’ he told Climate Brief.

Rough comparisons in a paper by Professor Joris Cromsigt from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences suggests that white rhinoceros, hippopotamus and elephants are among the least polluting grazers

Rough comparisons in a paper by Professor Joris Cromsigt from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences suggests that white rhinoceros, hippopotamus and elephants are among the least polluting grazers

Researchers also believe that climate change could be making wildfires worse.

This is because global warming is leading to more extreme temperatures in the summer and less trainfall.

According to scientists, large herbivores such as rhinos eat fallen leaves and vegetation which could otherwise start fires.

Researchers say that herbivores ‘limit fuel quantity by consuming and recycling plant matter that would otherwise accumulate as litter, and by reducing the density of vegetation.

‘This can mean that zones of low and high flammability are interspersed in arrangements that could impede the spread of landscape fires’, researchers wrote.

They also inadvertently create fire-breaks.

They do this by ‘forming trails, dust-baths or leks, large animals create lines or patches of bare ground’.

Previous research found that in Hluhluwe in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, removing rhinos from a test area caused the size of fires to increase 50-fold.

Dr Cromsigt suggests that one way to encourage people to protect wildlife would be by making it 'pay for itself'. He believes that if people stopped eating farmed beef and instead ate meat from wild-grazing animals, wildlife could be better protected

Dr Cromsigt suggests that one way to encourage people to protect wildlife would be by making it ‘pay for itself’. He believes that if people stopped eating farmed beef and instead ate meat from wild-grazing animals, wildlife could be better protected

WHY SHOULD BISON PROTECTIONS BE RECONSIDERED?

Yellowstone’s herd of 4,000-plus bison constitutes the largest and one of the last free-roaming, genetically pure groups of an animal that once roamed

North America by the millions before being hunted to near extinction in the late 1800s.

Conservation groups have argued that endangered species status is necessary to ensure the long-term survival of wild bison, also widely known as buffalo, and help restore the creature to more of its historic natural range.

The bison, a shaggy, hump-shouldered animal weighing up to 2,000 pounds (990 kg) and standing 6 feet (1.8 metres) tall at the shoulders, was officially designated the U.S. national mammal in 2016.

The Fish and Wildlife Service concluded in 2015 that conservation groups had failed to present sufficient evidence that the Yellowstone buffalo band was imperiled.

U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper ruled that the Interior Department agency had erroneously failed to consider or otherwise ignored evidence indicating Yellowstone bison may be threatened or endangered.

A federal judge has ordered U.S. wildlife officials to reconsider a decision that blocked greater for protections the park's iconic bison herds, which are routinely subject to slaughter when they attempt to leave the park

A federal judge has ordered U.S. wildlife officials to reconsider a decision that blocked greater for protections the park’s iconic bison herds, which are routinely subject to slaughter when they attempt to leave the park

The ruling hinged on a scientific dispute over whether there are two genetically distinct populations of bison at Yellowstone, known respectively as a central herd and a northern herd.

Conservationists cited research suggesting the government´s overall target at the park of 3,000 bison was too low to prevent extinction of one or both of them.

Government biologists dismissed that research.

But Cooper said the Fish and Wildlife Service was required by law to explain why it found the research irrelevant, and he ordered a new agency review of whether Yellowstone bison merit protections.

October Bucket Fund:  SKINNY, 24 year-old mustang mare and her new baby, plus 4 orphaned mustang foals – all from last week’s roundups – rescued! At least we can help a few of the hundreds now separated from their families and in holding pens.

Click here to read their story.  Click here to donate!  THANK YOU.  All donations are $100% tax deductible.


Riding Warehouse
Your purchase with Riding Warehouse through this link helps the Bucket Fund!


Supporting The Bucket Fund through Amazon Smile
Please choose HORSE AND MAN, INC when you shop via Amazon Smile through this link.



HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!