OK, BUCKLE YOUR SEATBELTS (graphic)… OUR SEPTEMBER BUCKET FUND… 2 HOUSTON VETS HAVE OPENED THEIR DOORS AND POCKETBOOKS TO HELP 47 HARVEY VICTIM HORSES! Here are 5 stories… LET’S HELP THEM HELP THESE HORSES!- all tax deductible donations go directly to the equine hospitals housing them! PLEASE FORWARD!






It was exactly a year ago that we helped Jackie and Sugar from the Louisiana floods…

Now, we are hoping to help another set of 40+ horses who were plucked from the malignant high waters from Hurricane Harvey and are now waiting for their skin to slough off – and other horribly painful gouges and horrific conditions.

PLEASE HELP these incredible vets – Kris Anderson, DVM in Santa Fe, Texas (near Houston) and by Dr. Ben Buchanan, DVM from Brazos Valley Equine Hospital – who are doing this on their own dime.  Many of these 40+ horses were found wandering, owner surrendered or owners who have been devastated and without funds to care for their horses.

All donations will go directly to these vet hospitals and to these horses.  ALSO, Brazos Valley Equine Hospital (FaceBook linked here) is large and has a backstock of supplies/antibiotics – they are currently helping many vets in the area who are not able to get supplies due to high water.  They are giving supplies away to whomever needs them.

These Docs are angels.  Thank you.

All donations are 100% tax deductible.  Please help us help them.  Thank you in advance.

Please forward.  I know we are late in the Harvey donation cycle, but these horses are just now coming onto our radar.  Thank you!




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This young breeding stallion was rescued in chest deep water. As you can see, he is losing all of his lower body skin. Infection is a huge concern.

What you are seeing is correct. This young stud who was found in Houston… is losing his skin in huge pieces. They said he ‘crinkles’ when he walks. Ouch. This will need lots of antibiotics and hourly salves/treatments.

JACKIE – the only one of her group to survive…

She has the same name and is the same Pinto color as the horse named Jackie last year in Louisana.  This is Jackie from Houston.  She was one of 6 horses stranded in 5-6′ high water.  All died except for this mare.  Incredible.  She is a fighter.

Jackie loves to eat.  Her high appetite makes the vets feel hopeful.

Chest.

The water was 6′ high. She was with 5 other horses who all died. Unimaginable.

This has to be horribly painful.

This is Jackie’s udder.  Holy horsegods.  We need to help this mare.

BUBBA GUM AND BREEZY – hung up on barbed wire, in 4′ of water.

Bubba Gum and Breezy are young horses who lived together in Houston.  They were hung up on a barbed wire fence in 4′ of water for days.

The photos aren’t showing the degree of ligament and soft tissue damage the vets describe, so I put in an arrow.  These guys can hardly walk right now.  They had to be helped into the rescue trailer because they couldn’t push themselves up.

The vet said they ‘bunny hopped’ into the trailer to save themselves.

This is young colt, Bubba Gum, was caught on a barbed wire fence. His soft tissue injuries are very severe, along with the water damage.

This is 3 year old Filly, Breezy. You can see where the barbed wire gouged her!  She has many scrapes and huge wounds. She will have months of recovery.

Bubba’s underside. Ugh.  He can’t bear much weight on the right rear.

JOEY – HE LOST HIS BEST FRIEND, TOO – alone for a week in this condition…

This one is really sad.  In the town next to the chemical plant that exploded, everyone had to evacuate without notice.  No one could move their animals.  Police wouldn’t get back in to help their animals.

This is Joey.  His owner had to leave him and his jenny best friend during the evacuation.  The jenny drown.

Joey was alone, for a week, with her dead  next to him.  He is hopelessly depressed (as is the donkey way with loss) and needs extensive, long term treatment for all four legs.  He isn’t weight bearing on  his left rear.

His owner cannot afford his treatment.

We would be helping Joey and his owner, for sure.

Joey was alone with his best friend after the chemical plant exploded. She didn’t make it. He survived for a week like this. Alone.

His legs are like this all the way around…

PLEASE HELP US HELP THESE HORSE AND 42 MORE … BEING TREATED BY THESE TWO INCREDIBLE HOUSTON VETS!

All donations are 100% tax deductible!




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Jackie thanks you…



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21 comments have been posted...

  1. dawndi Post author

    Thank you! This is so kind and great to hear. Yes, we work hard to find legitimate recipients whose caretakers will use the donations appropriately.

  2. Juan Estrada-McDermott

    I know Ben personally and he is one of the smartest and most dedicated vets I´ve ever known. I can assure you all that the horses at Brazos Valley are getting the best care posible by him and his team!

  3. Jennie

    I just want to thank you for all the good you are doing.We searched a lot of places to donate this was the one we chose. We have a wonderful program here in Northern California to help animals during times like this.

  4. Carolyn Kelly

    Would any of the JJ Watt $ be available at all to help these babies?

  5. Paula

    I think the vets are wonderful, if it just comes down to money then all of you are wrong, help the animals and if they have owners that can’t afford their vet bills, it can be a tax write off, in the case of a natural disaster everyone needs to help everyone, human or animal, and everyone needs to get these animals back with there owners or anyone that wants to take them, money should never be a requirement in the case of a natural disaster, just saying, the animals didn’t have a choice.

  6. Cathy

    I realize the devastation that occurred in that area of our state but what I don’t understand is you knew it was coming how could you leave your animals to suffer and possibly drown or end up like these poor things. Ownerless is right they’ve been ownerless since the time they came in possession of these so-called animal people.

  7. Leslie

    Having dealt with many rescues in the NW, where skin sloughing is not uncommon, we use Shreiner’s and it is miraculous. I have seen many come back from much worse skin loss. I could never find the product in the southern states, but in the marshy NW track, performance and rescue vets agree. Another really affordable way it to dress twice a day, with fine point needle to debride with saline, then dress with sugar, iodine and gentamicin, cotton wrap and cover. Good old penicillin IM.

  8. dawndi Post author

    I hear you… but in this case, I have to trust the people around Joey. His vet and his owner are doing their
    best by him. I did receive a pic today of Joey and he looks very alert and more engaged. I am fairly certain
    that he will turn around once he realizes that his human family is back and caring for him. I’ll send the photo
    to you. I think you will be pleased. (I will also post it on the blog during Joey’s update coming soon.)

  9. Carol

    Please, let that poor donkey out of his misery. Not only is he suffering physically, but mentally as well. His owner can’t afford, and he will suffer in pain for weeks now. I’m all for rescuing, for the purpose of reuniting with owners, and saving from a tortuous death. But some of you need to face reality and be , logical in the face of this disaster. Funds are needed, please put them to use for animals who have a better outcome. Some may be better off out of this misery. Trust me, I am tortured by the thought of all those enduring alone out there today.

  10. dawndi Post author

    I hope you are angry at the word “ownerless” and not the actions here. We are simply gathering funds to help the vets who
    are aiding these horses. Some have been surrendered, some gathered as strays and some whose owners have no funds to care for them.
    At this point, most of them are ownerless. Of course we hope they are reunited when possible.

  11. cheryl

    THESE EQUINES ARE DISPLACED FROM THEIR FAMILIES, NOT OWNERLESS.

    I have been hearing Horror stories about people not being able to find their animals, or not being able to look at the animals in shelters to see if their animals are there just heart breaking. THEY NEED to be able to be reunited with their animals, in most cases that is all they have left after HARVEY took everything else from them.
    THIS IS UNACCEPTABLE TO THE PEOPLE THAT HAVE LOST SO MUSH ALREADY SHAME ON YOU PEOPLE AND YOUR ORGANIZATION.

    HERE is my Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/HorseLoversOld.New.RescueHorsesToo/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

  12. dawndi Post author

    I hear you… what I meant by ‘ownerless’ is that these horses were turned into Animal Control
    or simply brought to the equine hospital without information on their owners. Many owners are struggling
    and have no idea where their pets ended up during the severe flooding. I’m not sure how to express what I mean –
    these vets are being selfless. That is what I mean.
    From what I know, only the donkey has a known owner (who cannot afford care for him). The others were gathered or surrendered
    by owners in complete economic devastation.
    I’m sorry if I was unclear.

  13. Julie

    I fully appreciate every single thing you guys are doing for these animals, however it makes me a little angry when you say 47 ownerless horses. I can guarantee you all 47 of those horses have owners

  14. Jess

    My heart just breaks for these animals and the many others out there. I can’t imagine the loss or how the owners may feel. SO thankful for the ones able and willing to help!

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