EMERGENCY BUCKET FUND: ANOTHER ONGOING RESCUE OF A DOWNED, COMPLETELY WILD, NEVADA RANGE HORSE! PLEASE HELP THEM HELP HIM (and others)!






*I AM SADDENED TO SAY THAT THIS YOUNG HORSE DID NOT SURVIVE.  THEY SUSPECT WEST NILE VIRUS.   THE BUCKET FUND IS ACTUALLY FOR A PIECE OF EQUIPMENT – AN “A FRAME” THAT HELPS ERECT DOWNED HORSES.   I WAS DEMONSTRATING HOW WELL THIS TEAM WORKED VIA THIS DOCUMENTED RESCUE (therefore adding value to the need for the A-Frame)… AND DID NOT EXPECT HIM TO EXPIRE.  SO SAD.

 

These photos are utterly amazing.  This horse is a very sick, very wild  2 year old Virginia Range mustang stallion. These volunteers and first responders brought all of their large equine rescue gear and got to work.

THINK OF THE RISKS these people took to help this ailing and downed young stallion…  And now LRTC has lost a key piece of equipment – An “A-Frame” that helps stand up a downed horse.




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All photos courtesy of Pine Nut Wild Horse Advocates

HIS STORY

ADDENDUM:  THIS COLT PASSED.  I’M VERY SORRY TO REPORT.  THEY ARE WAITING FOR TESTS BUT IT APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN WEST NILE VIRUS.

This 2 year old stallion is well known to the Pine Nut Wild Horse Advocates.  They know this colt’s mother, father and all of his aunties/uncles/brothers/sisters.  They watched him grow.

So it was very difficult to see him sick and down.

The day before he was sore and his legs swollen.  The next morning, he was worse.  In no way would they let this compromised horse, one of their charges, become a predator meal…

So they jumped into action and called in the large equine response team (LRTC) to pick up this sick, wild horse.

Imagine.

The entire stallion band is standing there… yet these BRAVE humans came in to help this horse.  Not an easy task… HOW do you load a sick, wild horse whose buddies don’t want him to go?

Our friends at LRTC aided and documented this rescue.

Aunt Lilly and the others come up to talk to him and stay until the trucks arrived.

The first team meeting where the team leaders gives instruction, job descriptions and safety reminders.

Comments from Willis Lamm “Veterinarian Bruce Hartzell and Cindy, his wife / assistant assess the horse’s motor function (or lack thereof.) Everyone else remains clear of the hot zone at this point.”

Team leader Willis Lamm joins in to put together a plan as the colt lies quietly.
from Willis Lamm “We are still carefully managing the energy around the horse and also letting the horse get used to our presence. His “reactivity bubble” is starting to decrease, although he still is protective of his personal space.”

A sedative is applied to keep him quiet and stop him from hurting himself or the volunteers.
From Willis Lamm “the wild ones often need follow-up sedation before packaging as their adrenaline drive is pretty strong.”

Cindy holds his head as he is prepared to be loaded in the trailer.
From Willis Lamm “Head management is important, even while sedated, and can sometimes be challenging, hard work.”

The young stallions band stands back and watches the activity as the emergency team prepares him for transport. We know this band and were comfortable with their presence. But the rescue team were unsure of Blue and what to expect. We were asked to keep an eye on him. One of these mares is the Mother.

Blue watches… anxious why his son is down.

From Willis Lamm: A good one showing the process of hobbling the horse. Note the tethering of the responder (me in this case) reaching over the horse. This guy was uncoordinated but he could still strike so we use long tools and make sure the “horse person” can’t slip over the horse into the “kill zone” if the horse makes a sudden move.

From Willis Lamm Rolling the horse over onto the Rescue Glide. There is actually webbing attached to the hobble set so those pulling are out of reach of the hooves. The head was managed by Bruce the vet, and while difficult to see, is controlled via the recovery strap. Once rolled over the head was again held down.”
The horse has been down for several hours. Rolling takes pressure off the internal organs and helps circulation.

From Willis Lamm On the Rescue Glide, Z-rig haul line attached and making a final check. We should have moved the slip sheet farther away since we didn’t end up using it and those things are slippery. (Note: The Horse and Man Group donated the slide previously.)

From Willis Lamm “Readjusting hobble position in preparation for drawing the legs onto the glide. (Bruce should have been tethered but I do “have his back” from a low, buttressed position.)”

Loading him up to transport
From Willis Lamm “Use of the lightweight aluminum folding ramps. These things make loading so much easier. 3 people on the haul line were able to easily pull the horse inside.”

Loaded and nearly ready to go. The volunteers put away the equipment.
from Willis Lamm “Final check before starting down a pretty rough dirt road – glorified Jeep trail actually. This is a good illustration as to how the ramps fold up for compact storage.”

The straps are being removed.
from Willis Lamm ” Carefully removing restraints in a logical order so the horse wouldn’t try to get free while still partially secured.”

Rescued and awaiting a diagnosis and treatment.  It is suspected West Nile Virus.

CAN WE HELP this Team purchase the piece of equipment to continue to rescue large animals?  This young stallion, Baby Milan from last month and numerous other wild and personal horses have been saved by the LRTC Team.

Can we help them continue to help others?  CAN WE HELP them replace the very important piece of equipment that has broken?

All donations are 100% tax deductible.  THANK YOU in advance!



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West Nile is suspected… He is eating and drinking.

EVERY DONATION COUNTS!

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TWO WONDROUS THINGS… all things being relative.






Well, I just spent the last of my last job’s money.

Gwen has a shelter.

Hallelujuh!

I should say that Annie has another shelter that she let’s her guests use… or as I intended, whomever is sharing with Annie won’t have to continually be run out of Annie’s shelter which  has enough shade for 2 but Annie is very territorial – and much bigger than anyone else, so she wins.

This means that the larger, upper paddock that has access to the 5 acre paddock, now has a 2nd shelter.

Theoretically, I can separate Annie from whomever she is terrorizing AND give that horse shade as well.

Phew!

Here we have Annie standing where the new shelter is being erected. I love how they stand under it, even without the roof… It is 27 x 18 – so way big enough for 2 horses.

And here we have the roof!  This new shelter is next to the pony pasture shelter and also on the other side of the short row of trees I planted recently. This area will have shade all day – so whomever is living with Annie will have their own shelter. (Annie tends to get grumpy and push others out of ‘her’ shady area – even though there is plenty of room for 2…  Since she has about 400lbs on everyone else, she wins.)

ANOTHER GREAT THING…

The Sycamore tree in front here, was a scraggly thing in Spring.  But now it is going gangbusters!  (Don’t worry, the wind blows away from the horses.).  Closer to the fenceline is a Poplar that I just planted a month ago.  It is doing well.

Down the center aisle, that you cannot really see very well, I have two, tallish Mulberries and a Poplar that Annie trimmed beyond recognition.  It is still healthy, just very short on one side.  Sigh.  Now we have hotwire protecting it.  There is hotwire all around Annie’s paddock.

It is a bit tough to see here… but the trees in front are a very healthy Sycamore that was a twig in Spring (amazing), the tree close to the horses is a Poplar. The three trees (hard to see) that run down the aisle between the pastures are 2 Mullberries and a Poplar that Annie trimmed way too short. Sigh

THE 2ND GREAT THING!

Well,  ‘Marty’s Farrier shed’ didn’t work out so well for the farrier.  The horses were not settled in there – they much preferred being trimmed in their own paddocks.

So, that’s what we did and it worked out fine.

Hmmm, what to do with Marty’s Shed ?… MAKE A HAY SHED out of it!

Yay!  Perfect.  Why didn’t I think of that sooner?!

Using this shed as a hay shed enabled me to have a load delivered and stored!!!

So. Happy.

I know, I know, it still isn’t sound for winter… but it will work much better than the ground or the back of my truck.  And, I can cover it more easily here.  I’ll add pallets to the bottom, some tarps and we are GOOD for winter!

Thank you, again, kind Marty, who donated this shelter.

THINGS ARE LOOKING UP!

 


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