REMEMBER CHAMP – THE STALLION WHO SAVED THE FILLY IN THE RIVER? Well… he and his herd are in trouble. Let’s help!






Do you remember the stallion who saved the filly in the river when she got in over her head?  He pulled her to safety and the feat was recorded by a nearby human, Becky Standridge.  In case you missed it, here is the blog about it.

Then, a few days later, I wrote about the Salt River Wild Horses again and told you all about their history… and gave you their FB page link.

Most of you probably remember this dramatic photo of Champ saving the filly... click image to read the story.

BAD NEWS FOR CHAMP AND HIS HERD – MEAT.

Well, as with most of the wild mustangs out there, their time has come to be rounded up –

Except this time it is worse because Champ’s herd is not classified as ‘wild’ so they are not protected under any laws.

They are classified as ‘feral’.

Feral means that they can be rounded up and sold for meat.

That’s it.

No one would ever know… the horses would be gathered and ‘poof’ – gone.

Fortunately, some individuals are very persistent and under the Freedom of Information Act, they have found out that Champ’s herd is headed down the path of no return.

Here he is... Champ. Wild and proud. A thinking stallion.

WE CAN.

How can Humans do away with this herd of horses?  Obviously this herd (and every herd) loves and cares for one another – which is the only way I know how to express what I saw in those photos.  Why are they not worth sharing the land?  They aren’t starving and no humans live there…

I’m just sick about this.

Are you?

If so, take the time and make the call, write the email and send the letter.

I know, I know – no one has time anymore.

But this time, money isn’t what they need.

They need voices.  They need humans to take the time to write and call and send.

Here is the story… straight from Becky who asked me if HORSE AND MAN readers could help Champ and his herd.

A new 2012 foal...

THEIR PLIGHT – WHAT HUMANS ARE DECIDING…

 

Press Release: For immediate release
Contact: Patricia Haight, Ph.D. (480) 593-4491
Becky Standridge: (480) 620-4490

PEOPLE ASKED TO HELP PREVENT REMOVAL & POSSIBLE SALE TO SLAUGHTER OF ARIZONA WILD HORSES WHOSE HISTORY TRACES TO 17TH CENTURY

DOCUMENTS OBTAINED UNDER FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) INDICATE THAT THE US FOREST SERVICE MAY REMOVE HORSES FROM THE TONTO NATIONAL FOREST WITHOUT A PERIOD FOR PUBLIC COMMENT OR AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STUDY

The bond.

 

(Phoenix, AZ, June 2, 2012). The Conquistador Equine Rescue and Advocacy Program (CERAP), a 501c3 equine rescue and advocacy charity, has received material under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) indicating that the United States Forest Service (USFS) may be considering the imminent removal of unbranded, free-roaming wild horses living along the Salt River on the Tonto National Forest (TNF) near metropolitan Phoenix in Arizona.

Beautiful.

Among these horses is the world famous Champ, the amazing stallion that saved a filly from drowning. His video can be viewed at the link below: http://www.azcentral.com/12news/news/articles/2012/04/05/20120405arizona-wild-horse-rescue.html

Becky Standridge observes the horses regularly and reports that she has not seen Champ and his family for several weeks. A stallion belonging to Champ’s band was found shot to death. This video can be viewed at the link below:
http://www.azcentral.com/video/1666316304001

The bachelors of the herd.

Standridge who has spoken with the USFS indicates that the USFS has disregarded her request for an investigation of the shooting because the USFS does not acknowledge that the horses are wild calling them “feral” or “trespass” horses. Therefore the agency does not take responsibility for managing them under the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Act.

They are healthy and happy.

Documents received under FOIA also support that the TNF does not acknowledge that the horses are wild and thus protected under the 1971 Act. Asserting the horses are not unclaimed, unbranded free-roaming horses as defined under the Act, the TNF considers them “trespassing” on USFS land and may remove all of them. It is possible that the horses would be taken to the Pacific Livestock Auction near Phoenix where they are at great risk of being purchased by killer buyers to sell for slaughter. FOIA material demonstrates that officials of the TNF have had horses removed before without any public comment period or study under the National Environmental Protection Act, a requirement for removal of wild horses on USFS land. In one case, forest officials admitted in emails that five horses gathered from the Cave Creek ranger district probably were not “trespass” or “feral.” The horses were sent to the Pacific Livestock Auction. CERAP was able to rescue the one foal with the herd of a stallion and his mares.

Lovely.

The origin of the Salt River Wild Horses can be found in historical documents that indicate the Spanish Missionary, Father Eusebio Kino, brought horses and other animals to the area in the 17th century. History also indicates that some additional horses came Conquistadors sent by Kino that arrived to help the Pima fight attacks from the Apache Indians. These wild horses have lived on the property that is now the Tonto National Forest before it was designated a National Forest. Witnesses have provided oral histories indicating the Salt River wild horses have been seen and photographed for decades in the TNF. One such photograph was printed in a 1957 issue of Arizona Highways. While the TNF claims the horses are “trespass horses” from the bordering Salt River-Pima Maricopa Community (SRPMIC) and the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, to the best of CERAP’s knowledge, the tribes have NOT claimed the horses.

Yes, we can help.

CERAP, working together with community members, is asking people to immediately telephone their United States Representative, both of their United States Senators, the Forest Supervisor for the Tonto National Forest and the Regional Director for Rangeland Management to tell them they do not want the horses of the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest removed. These horses are unbranded, unclaimed, free-roaming wild horses who are our living symbol of America’s freedom and the West. The horses are an indispensible part of our United States and Arizona history which must be protected so all future generations will have the privilege to be inspired and enjoy their beauty.

Slaughterbound.

WHAT YOU CAN DO – NOW!  TODAY IS A GOOD DAY FOR THIS…

Who to contact: Please call your US Congressman and your US Senators to politely request they express their disapproval of the gathering and removal of the horses that live along the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest. To find contact information for US Congressmen and US Senators by State, by name, or by zip code, go to the link below (this URL is case sensitive and should be entered with a capital ‘C’ on Contact and a capital ‘E’ for Elected):

http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml

Dave Stewart, Regional Director of Rangeland Management
Telephone: 505-842-3224
Fax: 505-842-3292
TTY: 505-842-3198
Address: 333 Broadway Blvd SE, Albuquerque, NM 87102-3407
Email: dmstewart@fs.fed.us

Youngsters playing.

HOW WE CAN HELP TOMORROW…

If we are successful in temporarily halting the progress of this obliterating action, I will make a Bucket Fund for their legal representation.  Hopefully, we will have the chance to help them financially…  Hopefully, they will live long enough.

Ironic, isn’t it.  Champ saved the filly from Mother Nature’s rising river, but he cannot save her from his worst natural disaster… humans.

PLEASE TAKE THE FEW MINUTES TO GIVE A VOICE TO THIS DESERVING FAMILY OF HORSES.

They are a family. We can help.

 

PLEASE FORWARD!

HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth… if you like this, please pass it around!

 

 

 

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31 comments have been posted...

  1. Myrna Burdick

    These horses belong to us, they are an example of a natural sight to behold in a natural
    setting. Fish and Game need to consider them as an important part of tourism along the Lower Salt River.
    Trespassers in the TNF! The horses are unbranded, they are unclaimed, they are wild
    living on vegetation that is not forage for other animals. Interfering with them by government agencies needs to be curtailed.

  2. LOOKINGTHRUWOLFEYES

    totally sickening. why oh why cant animals be left alone! there not hurting anything. tell people to go eat veggies leave life alone! we don’t need meat that bad that we have to kill everything in site.

  3. Tina Wooten

    The Salt River Wild Horses are very important to us all. They have been a big part of my healing for I was hurt and became disabled in my left arm and shoulder. I was in so much pain and suffering for a long time.I began to visit the Salt River Wild Horses and everything began to change for me and I became much better. I have also been taking photos and doing art with pictures of them for all to see. They have healed me and at the same time touched my heart and soul very deeply.The Wild Stallion Champ is a hero for saving his baby foal from drowning. I have witnessed a mother mare also saving her own baby foal as I took pictures. The Salt River wild Horses are very caring and smart.. Please don’t ever remove our Salt River Wild Horses for they are very important to the enviorment, health and well being of us all…Tian Wooten 4 Wild Horses!

  4. Jo Wilkinson

    There is NO need for horses to be slaughtered. There is NO need for horse meat! These animals are magnificent creatures who do not deserve to be slaughtered……. not for ANY reason!!!

  5. Ann Cahill

    You people in the suits need to find something else to do instead or torturing wild beautiful horses that have roamed this land well before you and I. Stop this tortuing, they are not hurting you, leave them alone in their natural habitat.

  6. Hannah Schroeder

    I take little comfort in the response above, from Paige at Tonto Forest.

    “…hedging words such as ‘may’ and ‘possible’…”, she wrote we should pay attention to, contained in the “news release”.

    Really?
    Admittedly, I haven’t seen the release to read it. But THEY (at this Forest Service) should admit to stirring this pot by putting the thing out there, hedging their words or not. Fight the fires, your #1 concern you say… and leave the horses be.

  7. Cherra Connor

    This must not be allowed. The state of Arizona has gone crazy with its control of everything.
    These animals must not be killed. Shame on you lawmakers for allowing this to happen.

  8. Bonita Woodward

    Please do not send these wild horses to slaughter! Continue to allow these beautiful
    animals be free! They are God’s creatures! It would be cruel to slaughter this wild family of horses! Again PLEASE do not do this!

  9. Dana Lacroix

    Dear Mr. Stewart,
    I am writing to you from Canada, and although I am not a US citizen, I write to you today concerning a matter that has thousands of people worried and distraught enough to raise the alarm in the US, Canada and even around the globe. There has been news of an impending round-up of horses in the Salt River Area of Arizona, under the pretence that somehow they don’t belong there—this is where the word ”feral” is often used to describe these wild horses and give the impression that someone suddenly turned them loose to fend for themselves, which is not the case. These horses are unbranded, unclaimed, free roaming wild horses—they should be protected as a national treasure-a symbol of America’s freedom. I was in Arizona recently and while visiting , I attempted to locate areas where I might glimpse some wild horses but unfortunately did not have a long enough stay to complete that goal. I intend to go back and search some more because nothing would thrill me more than to see wild horses while I am there. I do not understand how you can possibly be thinking of removing wild horses, especially the herds in and around the Salt River area! Are you aware that among these horses is a stallion known as Champ who is now world famous due to photos taken of him saving a young herd filly from drowning in the river?? These animals are amazing and an indispensable part of the US/ Arizona history. To remove wild horses from your state is a mistake –everywhere I went in Arizona were pictures and stories of wild horses, but no mention of where they could be found! I thought that was strange and now the disturbing news that they are going to be rounded up and either put in holding pens or sent to slaughter! That is a horrible crime against the last wild remnants of an animal that has literally helped us build the world we know today. Please put a halt to this insanity—there are many people who would absolutely cherish an encounter with wild horses as they are sadly disappearing from our world. I hope you realize what you have before it is too late.
    Sincerely, Dana Lacroix,
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Canada

  10. jill

    Hi Elyse. Just a neither here nor there F.Y.I… I believe the Heber wild horses you mentioned that were saved resulted from the Rodeo-Chediski Fire back in 2002 when approx. 400 horses moved from Apache reservation and were labeled “trespass horses”. The forest service originally intended to round them all up and send them to auction/slaughter, even the foals.

  11. jill

    Dear Becky,. We have seen each other in TNF. I am the woman who hikes almost every weekend with my 2 very friendly pit bulls although I have not been for a couple of months, one of the dogs had shoulder surgery and is on house rest. We know “Champ” very well. My dogs are scared of him because he will chase them off to protect his “family”, which is good! I have mega pic’s of the Salt River horses myself. I love them dearly. If I can help in anyway please call upon me. Also, when you get the Bucket Fund started please let me know, I would love to contribute. You are not alone in this fight or your love for these horses, I promise. God Bless you for helping them so much!!

  12. Robin Boren

    This must not be allowed!!! These animals deserve to live and thrive…they are not harming anything or anyone…They must be protected “feral” “wild” what is wrong with these people that want to destory every beautiful thing left in America…They must be protected under the Free roaming Wild Horse and Burro Act. Get real people!!! As far as this being an “untruth” or misunderstanding….many horses have ended up on a dinner plate due to a “misunderstanding”. I have little faith in the powers at be on this one!! I do not trust they are telling the truth. This is the worse tragedy….PLEASE STOP WITH THE LIES AND LET THESE SWEET BEAUTIFUL CREATURES INHABIT THE EARTH!!

  13. Kathleen Hayden

    Tonto National Forest Supervisor Reta Lafordtonto_webmail@fs.fed.us
    Dave Stewart, Regional Director of Rangeland Management
    Email: dmstewart@fs.fed.us

    Re Salt River Wild Horse Herd/ Tonto National Forest RMP amendment

    Dear Supervisor Laford

    Historical documents indicate that the Spanish Missionary, Father Eusebio Kino brought Colonial Spanish horses to the southern Arizona region in the 17th century. Oral histories by witnesses indicate that they have seen and photographed the horses for decades on the TNF and a picture shows three of these magnificent animals in a 1957 Arizona Highways Magazine. While the Tonto NF claims the horses are “trespass horses” from the bordering Salt River Pima Maricopa Nation and the Ft. McDowell Reservation, to the best of CERAP’s knowledge the tribes have NOT claimed the horses

    I hereby respectfully request and/or demand that the US Forest Service amend the Tonto National Forest Resource Management Plan. The RMP must be amended by operation of laws to comply with mandates that maximize protections for wild horse/burros herds. The amendment must ensure the genetic continuity of the free-roaming wild horses living along the Salt River on the Tonto National Forest (TNF) near metropolitan Phoenix in Arizona as a distinct population segment of a special status species. I include myself among the American peoples that claim this herd as our cultural heritage wild horse herd. The USFS and USFWS are required to protect and maintain herd inventories on their migratory ranges in this region. I claim my rights for this herd under the ESA, NEPA , ESA, NHPA Sec 106,and 1971 FRWHBA by claiming that the TNP RMP is technically and fatally flawed.

    Documents received under FOIA indicate that the USFS does not acknowledge that the horses are wild and thus protected under the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Act.

    Without sufficient data to prove that the horses are not unclaimed, unbranded free-roaming horses as defined under the Act, the TNF considers them “trespassing” on USFS land. In light of recent court decisions I contest the USFS assertion and allegation that they have any jurisdiction to remove this wildlife.

    Consider the Sage Grouse decision (http://www.eenews.net/assets/2011/09/30/document_gw_01.pdf from pages 18-37) as it pertains to basis for RMP amendments, accumulative effects, and special status species to be managed as a candidate for ESA listing. The decision apparently is based on conserving species before they need the ESA: see http://www.fws.gov/endangered/news/bulletin-summer2009/conserving-species-before-esa.html

    It is important to inject here that in May 2003 BLM acknowledged that wild equids had special species status . The agency commented in the Nevada Test and Training Range Resource Management Plan and Final EIS “The issue of a wild horse as an invasive species is moot since the 1971 WHBA gave wild free-roaming horses “special” status based on their heritage of assisting man settle the “west”
    NEPA and NHPA Sec 106 Review
    Under the Council on Environmental Quality’s NEPA regulations, categorical exclusions must allow for “extraordinary circumstances” in which NEPA analyses ARE necessary to deal with an action’s real-world impacts. The agency, having made a “catex” overlooked the need to allow for such circumstances. “Extraordinary circumstances” DO exist including non compliance of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Based on prior EA’s, BLM must comply with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act prior to any action taken by a jurisdictional agency.
    Where does the TNP RMP indicate that the USFS or USFWS or State fish and game have given consideration to the landscape, historical and cultural contribution/significance of the Salt River Herd. Where are the studies of the herd’s migratory ranges on the public domain? Does the absence of this data constitute a serious flaw in analysis of environmental impacts, both under Section 106 and under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)?
    The current definition of ACECs defining areas of Critical Environmental Concern were authorized in Section 202 C3 of FLPMA, P.L. 94-579.
    ACECs are areas where special management attention is needed to protect, and to prevent irreparable damage to important historic, cultural and scenic values; fish; or wildlife resources or other natural systems or processes.etc An area meets the relevance criterion if it contains one or more of the following….significant historic, cultural or scenic value….fish and wildlife resource including but not limited to habitat for endangered, sensitive or threatened species, or habitat essential for maintaining species diversity…etc
    As stated in Mountain States v. Hodel “In structure and purpose, the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act is nothing more than a land-use regulation enacted by Congress to ensure the survival of a particular species of wildlife. Wild horses and burros are no less “wild” animals than are the grizzly bears that roam our national parks and forests. Neither the States nor the Federal Government has title to these creatures until they are reduced to possession by skillful capture. It is interesting to note that Utah’s BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro manager states “Foals, pregnant mares and older horses are easily hurt when pursued, so please allow them to live a free and unharassed life.
    FOIA material demonstrates that officials of the TNF have had horses removed before without any public comment period or study under the National Environmental Protection Act, a requirement for removal of wild horses on USFS land. In one case, forest officials admitted in emails that five horses gathered from the Cave Creek ranger district probably were not “trespass” or “feral.” The horses were sent to the Pacific Livestock Auction. CERAP was able to rescue the one foal with the herd of a stallion and his mares.
    My final comment on this issue is a respectful demand for indemnification to ensure that these horses will not be taken to the Pacific Livestock Auction near Phoenix where they are at great risk of being purchased by killer buyers to sell for slaughter.

    Sincerely and in appreciation for consideration,

    Kathleen Hayden

  14. Sue Fredrick - Wisconsin

    State of Arizona,
    This is the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard of. Why on earth would anyone even think of killing and slaughtering these beautiful creatures! Does MAN have to have dominion over everything, can’t there be any creatures wild and free? They are exquisitely beautiful to see running free, and what harm do they do? Please don’t do this awful thing!! We need to save these animals not DESTROY them.

  15. Barbara B.

    Who to call, where to write? I was not aware of this, and cannot understand what is happening in this country. We seem to kill willynilly, anything that stands in the way of money. Can’t stand the thought of these horses being killed.

  16. Elyse Gardner

    One more thing: I love the definition of “integral”: an essential part of. One cannot claim wild burros and horses as an “essential part” of the natural system of the public lands and remove them as “feral” in the same breath.

    The only way to do this is for the Forest Service to try to deny their wildness. If they are unbranded and unclaimed, they are wild. According to the Act, if they existed in this area in 1971 and before, they have a right to remain there.

  17. Elyse Gardner

    One more thing: I love the definition of “integral”: an essential part of. One cannot claim wild burros and horses as an “essential part” of the natural system of the public lands and remove them as “feral” in the same breath.

    The only way to do this is for the Forest Service to try to deny their wildness. If they are unbranded and unclaimed, they are wild. If they existed in this area in 1971 and before, they have a right to remain there, with few exceptions.

  18. Elyse Gardner

    I’ve spoken with a good friend who works with BLM. What he told me is the best way to help these horses in the Tonto National Forest is to be able to find someone to witness to the fact that horses lived there in 1971 OR BEFORE. Monika has written a great letter where she quotes the history of these horses in this area, the photographic and other evidence that there were horses in that area in 1971 and before, and that’s exactly the type of evidence we need. (Actually, this is the way to help any horses covered under the 1971 Act (which horses on Forest Service land are, altho the FS behaves as though they aren’t) and I’ll quote you the law in a minute.

    He told me that up by Heber, AZ , horses were saved; that after a rodeo or some such they found horses they were going to round up, same scenario, but people were able to establish that it was an area where horses existed in 1971, and the horses were saved/allowed to remain. (I don’t know if they are still there?)

    We all need to be repeating that in our own words, make it an undeniable issue, an unavoidable issue, and quoting the law, making it very clear that these horses meet all the criteria of the law. I never tire of reminding people of this law. It still is the law.

    Now for the law: The 1971 Act specifically covers 2 aspects of this situation. Please pay particular attention to (a) and (b) below. “Secretary” includes Mr. Tom Vilsack, not just Mr. Ken Salazar. “Public lands” includes Forest Service land.

    To require the protection, management, and control of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress finds and declares that wild free-roaming horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the West; that they contribute to the diversity of life forms within the Nation and enrich the lives of the American people; and that these horses and burros are fast disappearing from the American scene. It is the policy of Congress that wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, or death; and to accomplish this they are to be considered in the area where presently found, as an integral part of the natural system of the public lands.
    Sec. 2. As used in this Act-
    (a) “Secretary” means the Secretary of the Interior when used in connection with public lands administered by him through the Bureau of Land Management and the Secretary of Agriculture in connection with public lands administered by him through the Forest Service;
    (b) “wild free-roaming horses and burros” means all unbranded and unclaimed horses and burros on public lands of the United States;…

    Please also note the definition of “wild free-roaming horses and burros” means ALL UNBRANDED AND UNCLAIMED. What part of “all” don’t these people understand? And we also need to note that “Spanish blood,” while dramatic and historically fun, has no bearing in whether a horse is defined as wild under the law.

    My last comment: even if we are all mistaken in our concern (I hardly think so, but nevertheless here’s my point), we are raising enough of a ruckus that decision makers will recognize the big mess they are about to bite off if they seriously consider removing these horses.

    Great blog, Dawn. And what fabulous work Becky has been doing documenting these horses. You all do my heart good.

  19. Monika Courtney

    Now everyone gets the canned reply that they are spread thin and are busy with wildfires… really ? Is that the distracting component now against the rising public outrage of the horrific injustices against our wild horses ?? Or to call them feral because it’s a convenient way by the anti-horse faction to dismiss them out of the rivalry of the multiple use lands. These animals are all wild and free roaming horses and burros and are part of the land. The bureaucrats, livestock and hunter groups are full of self-serving discrepancies, and the horses are permanently scape goated.
    BLM and those far away in Washington not knowing the reality out West, just want to get rid of them all. It is a huge injustice – and everyone ought to read Craig Downer’s new book “The Wild Horse Conspiracy” – because it contains the truth and story that must be told.

  20. Connie

    The following is the reply from the Rep. with the Tonto National forest:

    There is apparently misinformation circulating on the internet that there is to be a “roundup” and “slaughter” of horses on the Tonto National Forest.

    This allegation is absolutely untrue. It is of extreme concern to us that this misinformation is being communicated because it is spreading our resources very thin as we deal with Arizona’s wildfire season – which, as you may know — began a month earlier than expected.….

    If folks will carefully read the news release containing the allegations, they will notice the use of such hedging words as “may,” “possible,” etc.

    Anything you can do to help alleviate this public concern by correcting this misinformation would be most helpful to us in continuing to manage the national treasure that is the Tonto National Forest.

    In the meantime, we appreciate your support and understanding as we continue with our current most challenging issue: wildfires in Arizona.

  21. Nona

    Ms. VanDamme —

    There is apparently misinformation circulating on the internet that there is to be a “roundup” and “slaughter” of horses on the Tonto National Forest.

    This allegation is absolutely untrue. It is of extreme concern to us that this misinformation is being communicated because it is spreading our resources very thin as we deal with Arizona’s wildfire season – which, as you may know — began a month earlier than expected.….

    If folks will carefully read the news release containing the allegations, they will notice the use of such hedging words as “may,” “possible,” etc.

    Anything you can do to help alleviate this public concern by correcting this misinformation would be most helpful to us in continuing to manage the national treasure that is the Tonto National Forest.

    In the meantime, we appreciate your support and understanding as we continue with our current most challenging issue: wildfires in Arizona.

    Thank you for your interest in the Tonto National Forest – Paige

    Paige Rockett

    Public and Legislative Affairs

    Tonto National Forest

    2324 E. McDowell Rd.

    Phoenix, AZ 85006

  22. Mary Pilger

    Please do not kill these beautiful animals. There is no reason to do that. It would be a senseless and horrific act. What earthly reason could any agency, private or government come up with to do such a thing.
    Wild and feral mean the same and that would apply to any animal that isn’t kept as a pet! This is inconceivable! All friends of animals will unite to help stop this atrocity!

  23. Connie

    Following is the email the I sent to the two emails listed above, If anyone would like to copy and send this email, please feel free to do so.

    Please stop and think before you decide that Champ and his herd are OK to be slaughtered. They are just as wild and any other horse. If you look up the meaning of feral, you will see the meaning is, as not domesticated or cultivated, ie: wild. Yes, He may have come from domesticated horses by now he is wild. And as such they should be protected. I guarantee that the mares he breeds with have been wild all along. Like any wild stallion he probably stole them from other wild stallions.

  24. Kyle Eaton

    Wait a minute – the definition of feral is WILD !!! What idiot thought this one up!

  25. Barbara Wood

    Thank you, Dawn, for sharing this! I’ve sent it to our Equi-Army team, and they are making calls/writing. I just sent my letters by e-mail. BTW, Ms. Laford is no longer there. Someone else has taken her place, and I left her a voice mail. Didn’t get her name, Paige something, I think. Please keep us posted on what else needs to be done.
    I’m going to try to post the link on Zenyatta’s site. I tried earlier this morning, but for some reason, I couldn’t get it to work.
    Thanks so much for all you’re doing!

  26. Athena Hogue

    This is ridiculous…”feral” and “wild” are one and the same, and it even says so in the dictionary…where do they come up with this stuff, even trying to change the definitions of these words to make it fit their CRIMES???

  27. Sherry Gould

    You must not kill these wonderful proud animals who have done nothing to anyone. They should be allowed to roam free as they have for years previous. Man thinks he is the controller of all things and that is not so. Please spare these fabulous horses. Sherry

  28. Craig Downercc

    This must not be allowed. These marvellous beings must be allowed to continue their life in freedom. They have so much that is truly positive to contribute and belong here. Their removal is a gross injustice and very cruel and heartless as well as witless!

  29. christine peniaranda

    state of Arizona, please do not kill the Salt River horses. they are descended from wild american mustangs several hundred years. please give them the same federal protections as our American wild horses under the Free Roaming Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971. thank you.

  30. Valerie Brooks

    Have you forwarded this on to the Fugly Blog? I’m sure they’d like to know about this situation….Just a suggestion. :) I’m forwarding to all of my animal friends, but it would be good to get this on another blog/forum/etc. if you haven’t already.

    Thanks for passing on this info. It’s important information to have.

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